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More than 1,500 protesters in Berlin march on streets to condemn police brutality and racism in Germany

police brutality and racism in Germany
More than 1,500 protesters in Berlin march on streets to condemn police racism and brutality

An anti-racism march took place in the German capital, Berlin, on Saturday. Holding posters saying, “racism kills, mentally, physically, globally,” more than 1,500 protesters marched through the inner city to condemn police brutality and racism in Germany.

Given that coronavirus restrictions are still in place in public spaces across Germany, many wore face coverings and attempted to keep 1.5 meters (5 feet) away from other protesters.

Germany: Police racial profiling study causes split in government

Two weeks ago, German Interior Minister Horst Seehofer decided to halt a proposed study into racial profiling among the country’s police force, stating that there appeared to be no “structural problem” in Germany’s police or public service.

The European Commission against Racism and Intolerance recommended that federal and state police in Germany commission a study into the use of racial profiling.

“So-called German police racial profiling isn’t permitted. This is taught during the initial and ongoing training, and it doesn’t happen,” the spokesman, Steve Alter, told reporters in Berlin.

Interior Minister Horst Seehofer wanted to first wait on a report on “extremist and racist tendencies” among public servants being compiled by Germany’s domestic intelligence agency before considering whether further steps were necessary, Alter said.

Germany’s minister for Justice, Christine Lambrecht, said that it is necessary that the course for the study be maintained and added that she would continue to press her case with Seehofer.

Police brutality and racism in Germany is very rampant and needs to be addressed.

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