Home » Empty store shelves: UK Supermarkets put pictures of vegetables in stores instead of real food, Germans wonder if the same will happen to them

Empty store shelves: UK Supermarkets put pictures of vegetables in stores instead of real food, Germans wonder if the same will happen to them

Empty store shelves UK: Some British supermarkets are now stocking up on photos of vegetables instead of real vegetables. Stores such as Tesco are putting up empty boxes with images of asparagus, carrots, oranges an grapes etc on cardboard.

The images look way better with full bursting shelves rather than empty horrible looking ones that advertise a lack of food supply, the reason: delivery problems.

Some of the British took to Twitter to make fun of the empty shelves:

https://twitter.com/B_E_Andre/status/1450924690105585685?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1450924690105585685%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bild.de%2Fpolitik%2Finland%2Fpolitik-inland%2Fleere-regale-bei-den-brexit-briten-nur-noch-fotos-statt-echtes-gemuese-78044096.bild.html

BILD wrote that ‘Corresponding recordings have been seen in Tesco markets in Fakenham and Milton Keynes, for example.’

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Another Twitter user shared the detergents shelf at a Tesco in Cambridge with the wording, ‘ Look carefully. The middle three rows are photographs’.

According to “Metro”, Tesco points out that the photos have been in use for months and should only keep “additional space” free for products as placeholders. This has nothing to do with the current delivery problems in Great Britain.

The shortness of the supply has been attributed to the BREXIT move that left Britain with a lack of truck drivers. Supply chains are also down and out leading to a reduction in the availability of goods.

Empty store shelves, and other amenities in the UK, have been a fear of most after the BREXIT decision and could continue being a norm. Germany now wonders if the same might occur in their stores.

Source: BILD